Pre-Course Offerings

Click the individual pre-course title for more information or scroll for information on all pre-courses.
 

RIAS 101:  An introduction to RIAS basics
Sunday, October 8, 2017 8:00am - 3:00pm ET

Grant Writing Workshop: Preparing Strong Applications in Health Communication Research
Sunday, October 8, 2017 8:00am - 3:00pm ET

Teaching Health Literacy, Cultural Humility and Health Equity – Innovation in Education and Practice
Sunday, October 8, 2017 9:00am - 3:00pm EDT  

RIAS 101: An introduction to RIAS basics

Baltimore Marriott Waterfront
700 Aliceanna Street I Baltimore, MD 21202
Sunday, October 8, 2017 8:00am - 3:00pm ET
Registration Fee: $175 (includes breakfast/lunch on your own)
Maximum number of participants: 15
*Minimum number: 10 participants (minimum registrations must be met by August 15 to confirm the course, and space is limited)

The objective of the workshop is to provide participants with a basic understanding of the RIAS – what it is designed to do and why and how it works, its operational definitions and coding mechanics and, and methodological issues related to reliability, validity and analysis. By the end of the workshop, participants will have sufficient knowledge of the system to complete a simple coding exercise and appreciate the richness and complexity of the coding data that is generated, how it fits within and outside of other coding approaches, and how it is used for research, training, and evaluation of clinical practice.  

The workshop will be divided into three parts:

  1. What is the RIAS designed to do – and how and why it works (most of the time).  
    Historical and theoretical foundations of the RIAS, an overview of the large RIAS-based body of published work and a discussion of what the RIAS does and does not do. This orientation is designed to be a conversation with critical analysis and input from attendees and reference to their research questions and programmatic applications they would like to address with the system. 

  2. Nuts and Bolts of Coding
    Basics 1: Participants will be introduced to the RIAS coding manual and become familiar with the operational definitions of the system’s basic coding elements. Working in small groups, participants will undertake a coding exercise using transcripts and audio recordings to gain experience and confidence in breaking up speech into units of analysis to which the RIAS codes are applied. Participants will work through the coding exercise individually and in small groups.  
    Basics 2: Participants will be given an opportunity to upload the RIAS software (compatible only with PCs --- sorry MAC users) and a sample of digital visit recordings for a coding practice exercise. Participants will work through the coding exercise individually and in small groups.
     
  3. Methodological Issues
    Discussion of coding reliability (intra and inter-coder), use of hybrid approaches to enrich quantitative coding with qualitative tags and narrative notes, discussion of statistical strategies to address the quantitative data and mixed methods approaches to integrate quantitative and qualitative data.  If time allows, discussion of novel research designs and anticipated future modifications of the software.

Course Facilitator:
Debra Roter, DrPH – Dr. Roter’s primary research focus is patient-provider communication. She is the author of the Roter Interaction Analysis System (RIAS) developed as method of process analysis applied to audio or video recordings of medical encounters which has been widely adopted by researchers, both nationally and internationally. Her studies include basic social psychology research regarding communication dynamics and interpersonal influence, as well as health education and health services research. Her research includes clinical investigation of patient and physician interventions to improve the quality of communication and enhance its positive effects on patient health outcomes, and educational applications in the training and evaluation of teaching strategies to enhance physicians' communication skills. Recent work has investigated the association between patients' and physicians' ethnicity and gender and their communication style and medical care outcomes.

Cancellation Policy: Registrations will be refunded (minus a $75 cancellation fee), if cancelled at least 30 days prior to the conference (September 8th). Cancellations after September 8th will not be refunded.

Grant Writing Workshop: Preparing Strong Applications in Health

Communication Research

Baltimore Marriott Waterfront
700 Aliceanna Street I Baltimore, MD 21202
Sunday, October 8, 2017 8am-3pm EDT
Registration Fee: $309 (includes breakfast/lunch is on your own)
Maximum number of participants: 30 participants
*Minimum number: 15 participants (minimum registrations must be met by August 15 to confirm the course, and space is limited)

Early-career scientists planning to submit grant proposals to the National Institutes of Health (NIH) or other funding agencies are invited to participate in this interactive workshop. This hands-on mentoring opportunity is led by an experienced NCI program director and two Principal Investigators with NIH funding experience.  This workshop will: 

  • Describe the NIH grant funding and review processes
  • Highlight relevant funding mechanisms and review panels in health communication research 
  • Share challenges and rewards in conducting NIH funded research 
  • Offer tips for successful proposal writing, including crafting biosketch and Specific Aims page
  • Provide an overview of current scientific priorities and research portfolio in health communication at the NIH. 
  • Offer “mock review” sessions for research aims/proposals under development. (Workshop participants are encouraged to bring their “Specific Aims” Page to the workshop.)
Criteria for participation: Health behavior and communication scientists from a variety of disciplines interested in a successful NIH/NCI funded career, including new faculty members and postdoctoral fellows

Requirement: Workshop participants will be asked to complete a brief survey (so we know their level of experience with NIH funding and their research areas for breakout session planning) and submit a draft Specific Aims page for peer review.

Course Facilitators:
Susan Eggly received her Ph.D. in communication studies at Wayne State University.  She is a Professor in the Population Studies and Disparities Program, Department of Oncology, Wayne State University/Karmanos Cancer Institute. Her research focuses on how patient-clinician communication affects patient outcomes in a variety of medical contexts, including cancer, primary care, end-of-life, and pediatrics. She has conducted several communication interventions, and has ongoing, NIH-funded research focused on clinical communication and outcomes related to clinical trials, health disparities, decision-making, pain, and parental bereavement. 
 
Wen-Ying Sylvia Chou is a Program Director in the Health Communication and Informatics Research Branch of the National Cancer Institute (NCI).  Her current research areas include social media for health, health literacy, and clinical communication about cancer prognosis and palliative care. Originally trained as a sociolinguist, she has extensive experience conducting mixed methods research on patient-provider interactions and narratives. Many of her publications examined the role of the changing communication landscape in health care and public health practice.  Dr. Chou is leading a number of trans-NIH initiatives in promoting innovative behavioral science research and is an experienced Program Director who mentors many early-stage investigators.  She currently supervises a large NIH-funded portfolio on health literacy, health disparities, and technology-mediated communication.  She completed a post-doctoral fellowship through National Cancer Institute’s Cancer Prevention Fellowship Program; she holds a MS and PhD in Linguistics from Georgetown University, and a Master of Public Health from the Interdisciplinary MPH program at UC Berkeley.

Maija Reblin is an Assistant Member in the Department of Health Outcomes & Behavior at Moffitt Cancer Center and an Assistant Professor in the Department of Oncologic Sciences at the University of South Florida in Tampa. She received a PhD in social/health psychology from the University of Utah.  Dr. Reblin’s research focuses on how the social context impacts the psychological and physical health of advanced cancer family caregivers. Specific areas of focus include relationship quality, social support, and interpersonal communication. She has completed and ongoing funding as PI and co-I from the American Cancer Society, the National Cancer Institute, and the National Institute of Nursing Research.

Cancellation Policy: Registrations will be refunded (minus a $75 cancellation fee), if cancelled at least 30 days prior to the conference (September 8th). Cancellations after September 8th will not be refunded.
Teaching Health Literacy, Cultural Humility and Health Equity –

Innovation in Education and Practice

Baltimore Marriott Waterfront
700 Aliceanna Street I Baltimore, MD 21202
Sunday, October 8, 2017 9:00am - 3:00pm EDT 
Registration Fee: $199 (includes coffee and snacks; breakfast and lunch is on your own) 
Maximum number of participants: 30 participants
*Minimum number: 15 participants (minimum registrations must be met by August 15 to confirm the course, and space is limited)

The main objective of the workshop is: 
To help participants sharpen their skills as professional development educators/lecturers and trainers by exploring best practices for teaching health literacy, cultural humility and health equity. 

Before the workshop we will:
Provide background material for participants to review for orientation in advance of the workshop.

During the workshop we will:
  • Be introduced to each other as a basis for exchange during the workshop, for networking and continued contact during the conference week and beyond.
  • Participate together in an introductory presentation on training formats and innovative experience in preparing professionals on health literacy and cultural competency and humility in health systems and other settings. Special emphasis will be made on diversity in methods of teaching (i.e. dialogue, narrative, self-reflection, role play, digital) and evaluation (i.e. self-efficacy check lists, Inventory of Assessing Health Professionals Cultural Competency - IAPCC-R).  
  • Learn of practical and applied experience through case-studies and demonstrations, from a panel of international experts, focusing on challenges and successes.
  • Share mutual experience in small groups, focusing on curricula that support and promote interactive and innovative teaching and training approaches, and modes of evaluation. Participants are encouraged to bring their own cultural competency curriculum, questions and contributions to the discussion.
  • Summarize through large group discussion the small group outcomes and conclusions, synthesizing and integrating practical recommendations. 
Following the workshop we will:
  • Comprise a compendium of resources and experiences shared during the workshop.
  • Provide a list of participants for continued networking and possible future collaboration.
Prerequisite:  
This workshop is relevant for any and all professionals seeking to motivate colleagues, team members and students for more effective practice in health literacy and cultural competency. 

Course Facilitators:
Sabrina Kurtz-Rossi, Med – Assistant Professor of Public Health and Community Medicine, Tufts University School of Medicine;  Director, Health Literacy Leadership Institute; Secretary General, International Health Literacy Association. She is a recognized health literacy professional development specialist.  She received the 2016 Health Literacy Teaching Award from the Association for Prevention Teaching and Research for her work developing health literacy curricula for health professions students.  She recently received a Tufts Innovations in Diversity Education Award to examine student learning gains in cultural competence and implicit bias using online asynchronous and synchronous dialogue.  

Diane Levin-Zamir, PhD, MPH,  MCHES, EuHP – Associate Professor of Public Health, University of Haifa, Israel; National Director Department of Health Education and Promotion, Clalit Health Services, Israel;  Global Working Group on Health Literacy co-convener of the International Union of Health Education and Promotion. She has vast experience in practice, policy and research in health literacy, cultural competence, and health promotion, and has led national surveys and intervention studies on health literacy and health literacy.  For over 3 decades she has participated in training on these topics in national and international settings.  

Cancellation Policy:
Registrations will be refunded (minus a $75 cancellation fee), if cancelled at least 30 days prior to the conference (September 8th). Cancellations after September 8th will not be refunded.