Program Details

Building on the skills learned in the RCF Program and ACH Train-the-Trainer Program, the FIT Program curriculum is comprised of 4 core domains, each with specific Entrustable Professional Activities (EPAs) and microskills that participants must demonstrate.

Click on each domain for corresponding EPAs and microskills:



  
  
  
  
For facilitation at ENRICH, external courses or at home institution:
 
EPA 1: Demonstrate understanding of and ability to lead the fundamental aspects of learner-centered, small group learning
  • Explain and teach the benefits of small group learning
  • Facilitate group member participation toward learning goals
  • Understand how different group members’ goals may be linked
  • Explain and teach the phases of group function
  • Recognize the group’s progression through phases of group function
  • Facilitate exercises to stabilize transitions through the phases of group function
  • Use a range of facilitation tools encompassing different interaction styles and modalities (e.g., Rogerian, Matrix, diversity)
  • Co-lead a learner-centered small group at ENRICH
EPA 2: Identify, modify, teach, and lead structural components of small group learning
  • Create an environment of safety that is conducive to optimal learning
  • Demonstrate a variety of skills such as openings, closings, check-ins, and group exercises
  • Recognize where the group is in the progression through phases of group function
EPA 3: Facilitate personal awareness in participants within the structure of and alongside communication skills practice
  • Be able to facilitate transitions back and forth between skills and Personal Awareness
  • Explain the impact of one’s own actions and teach how those actions affect the behavior/participation of participants
  • Check routinely for bias from self
  • Assist others to identify their emotional connections to the topic
  • Help others to clarify their motivation for behavior
  • Demonstrate and express empathy for all involved
EPA 4: Demonstrate ability as a co-facilitator to plan, co-lead, reflect and debrief the co-facilitation process associated with small group learning
  • Run a debrief after small group learning that includes:
      o Establishment of mutual agenda and agreement on process
      o Description of impact of session on self  
      o Discussion of impact of session on learners
      o Discussion of impact of individual elements of a session on the      session and course/workshop
  • Identify challenging participation by individuals and/or participant subgroups or derailment in group and at least two ways to address it
  • Identify next steps based on interpretation of perceived impact
  • Describe how past experiences or identities of facilitators and participants may have an impact on current behaviors
  • Describe the impact of their own actions and how those actions affected the behavior of participants
  • Incorporate feedback into small group and debrief processes
  • Co-lead both an integrated group and at least one other format (Narrative, Family of Origin, Leadership)
EPA 5: Recognize and engage with diversity within the group setting to enhance relationships and effectiveness of the group
  • Appreciate diversity and recognize and acknowledge what it contributes
  • Intentionally execute group activities that encourage recognition of diversity among the group members
  • Accurately describe during the debrief process the impact or potential impact of diversity on the function of the group
  • Gain understanding of common triggers of conflict around diversity
EPA 6: Incorporate elements of effective teamwork into the facilitation team or small group
  • Seek clarity of roles within the team or group
  • Identify unclarified roles within the team or group
  • Engage in activities that enhance the relationship of the members of the group such as team huddles, building the ground of health, use of appreciative inquiry, and effective, structured feedback
  • Model the elements of effective teamwork while co-facilitating
  • Engage in conflict utilizing basic skills in conflict engagement such as separating needs from position, clarifying assumptions, seeking perspective of others, relating the impact of behavior, and being non-judgmental
Skills to design, lead and present a workshop: 
 
EPA: Demonstrate competence in design of one session of a workshop
  • Incorporate new or creative content
  • Demonstrate a firm grasp of content through knowledge of published literature
  • Name the steps required to design a successful workshop

  • Understand the function of, and successfully implement, workshop elements in a timely way (didactic, practice time, exercises, transition, demonstrations, debrief)
  • Develop a plan to solicit and implement feedback about workshop session
  • Apply relevant aspects of small group facilitation to workshop development
  • Demonstrate reflection on the group creative process incorporating appreciative inquiry, conflict and diversity.
Encompasses feedback, teaching/educator roles, mentoring, remediation:
 
EPA 1: Demonstrate, model, and teach skills associated with establishing and maintaining an effective coaching relationship
  • Build trust, rapport, and knowledge of each other
  • Establish mutual agenda and agree on process

  • Intentionally and mutually create a relationship built on trust and knowledge of each other
  • Demonstrate unconditional positive regard
  • Demonstrate judicious and sufficient self-disclosure for the purposes of the coaching relationship
EPA 2: Demonstrate, model and, teach skills associated with setting goals for coaching
  • Introduce or use appreciative inquiry to discover known and unknown strengths of learner
  • Facilitate awareness of the impact of past experiences or identities on current behaviors
  • Establish, clarify, and update goals and objectives
  • Discover strengths and obstacles, including issues that involve diversity
  • Use opportunities around conflict engagement to practice relationship-centered skills
  • Help learner clarify their motivation for behavior
EPA 3: Demonstrate, model, and teach skills associated with developing an action plan with a learner or protégé
  • Design an appropriate strategy to use strengths to reach goals and overcome obstacles
  • Develop and implement the strategy
EPA 4: Demonstrate, model and teach skills associated with establishing accountability and assessing progress with learner or protégé
  • Maintain accountability of both parties in a relationship-centered way
  • Engage in learner-centered feedback
EPA 5: Structure feedback to enhance the ability of the learner (other) to process and apply it
  • Employ a systematic approach to the structure of feedback
  • Allow for enough time to engage in structured feedback prior to starting the session
  • Emphasize reinforcing feedback focusing on the strengths of the other
  • Check for impact of feedback on self and the other
  • Assist the other person to develop “take aways” from the learning and feedback session
EPA 6: Demonstrate skill in teaching key elements of effective feedback to learners
  • Understand and explain the rationale behind the use of dialogic relationship-centered and structured feedback
  • Be explicit and specific with regard to feedback and its importance to the process of learning and relationship development
Cultivate and use self-awareness in group and teaching situations
 
EPA 1: Cultivate awareness of one’s own emotions and biases; model and articulate the importance of personal awareness in relationship centered communication
  • Explain the impact of one’s own actions and how those actions affect the behavior of others
  • Check routinely for bias from self
  • Express accurately the level of emotional connection between self and the topic at hand
  • Display congruence between behaviors and verbal message
  • Describe the impact of past experiences or identities on current behaviors
  • Describe and demonstrate actions based on low-inference data rather than high-inference assumptions
EPA 2: Facilitate and teach facilitation of personal awareness in others to their benefit and attend to safety.
  • Demonstrate and express empathy and unconditional positive regard
  • Take intentional steps to establish a relationship with others prior to engaging in facilitation of personal awareness
  • Explain the meaning and importance of safety in a group and how that relates to trust
  • Allow for enough time to gently engage in personal awareness facilitation
  • Explore assumptions affecting behavior and interactions
  • Check with others to understand willingness to participate and impact of participation
  • Demonstrate and express empathy for all involved
  • Demonstrate unconditional positive regard
EPA 3: Handle challenging situations
  • Demonstrate and explain the contribution of emotion to challenging situations
  • Possess willingness to engage in conflict when in service to the needs of the group or relationship
  • Be able to identify your own triggers, seek to understand where they come from
  • Demonstrate use of skills to defuse conflict such as deep listening, ARTS, intent versus impact, PEARLS
  • Welcome and explore diversity


Woven within each of the 4 core domains are interpersonal skills of leadership, diversity, teamwork, and conflict engagement.  FITs are encourage to self-identify goals that address each of these key interpersonal skills.

Click on each interpersonal skill for a basic description and related core domain EPAs:

Leadership: exploring competencies and leveraging one's own strengths in service of leading a group.
 
  • Facilitation Domain
    EPA 1:
     Demonstrate understanding of and ability to lead the fundamental aspects of learner-centered, small group learning
    EPA 2: Identify, modify, teach, and lead structural components of small group learning
    EPA 4: Demonstrate ability as a co-facilitator to plan, co-lead, reflect and debrief the co-facilitation process associated with small group learning
    EPA 6: Incorporate elements of effective teamwork into the facilitation team or small group
     
  • Coaching Domain
    EPA 1
    : Demonstrate, model, and teach skills associated with establishing and maintaining an effective coaching relationship
    EPA 2: Demonstrate, model and, teach skills associated with setting goals for coaching
    EPA 3: Demonstrate, model, and teach skills associated with developing an action plan with a learner or protégé
    EPA 4: Demonstrate, model and teach skills associated with establishing accountability and assessing progress with learner or protégé
    EPA 5: Structure feedback to enhance the ability of the learner (other) to process and apply it
    EPA 6: Demonstrate skill in teaching key elements of effective feedback to learners
     
  • Personal Awareness Domain
    EPA 2: Facilitate and teach facilitation of personal awareness in others to their benefit and attend to safety
Diversity: understanding, recognizing, and managing bias and difference that arise in various relationships
 
  • Facilitation Domain
    EPA 5:
    Recognize and engage with diversity within the group setting to enhance relationships and effectiveness of the group
  • Coaching Domain
    EPA 1: Demonstrate, model, and teach skills associated with establishing and maintaining an effective coaching relationship
  • Personal Awareness Domain
    EPA 2: Facilitate and teach facilitation of personal awareness in others to their benefit and attend to safety
    EPA 3: Handle challenging situations
Teamwork: learning and employing relationship-centered elements that create high-functioning interprofessional teams
 
  • Facilitation Domain
    EPA 1:
    Demonstrate understanding of and ability to lead the fundamental aspects of learner-centered, small group learning
    EPA 4: Demonstrate ability as a co-facilitator to plan, co-lead, reflect and debrief the co-facilitation process associated with small group learning
    EPA 6: Incorporate elements of effective teamwork into the facilitation team or small group
     
  • Coaching Domain
  • EPA 1: Demonstrate, model, and teach skills associated with establishing and maintaining an effective coaching relationship

  • EPA 2: Demonstrate, model and, teach skills associated with setting goals for coaching

  • EPA 3: Demonstrate, model, and teach skills associated with developing an action plan with a learner or protégé

  • EPA 4: Demonstrate, model and teach skills associated with establishing accountability and assessing progress with learner or protégé

  • EPA 5: Structure feedback to enhance the ability of the learner (other) to process and apply it
     
  •  
  • Personal Awareness Domain
  • EPA 3: Handle challenging situations
Conflict Engagement: using relationship-centered approaches to engage constructively in and skillfully manage conflict
 
  • Facilitation Domain
  • EPA 1: Demonstrate understanding of and ability to lead the fundamental aspects of learner-centered, small group learning

  • EPA 2: Identify, modify, teach, and lead structural components of small group learning
    EPA 3: Facilitate personal awareness in participants within the structure of and alongside communication skills practice

  • EPA 4: Demonstrate ability as a co-facilitator to plan, co-lead, reflect and debrief the co-facilitation process associated with small group learning
    EPA 5: Recognize and engage with diversity within the group setting to enhance relationships and effectiveness of the group

  • EPA 6: Incorporate elements of effective teamwork into the facilitation team or small group
     
  • Coaching Domain
  • EPA 1: Demonstrate, model, and teach skills associated with establishing and maintaining an effective coaching relationship

  • EPA 2: Demonstrate, model and, teach skills associated with setting goals for coaching

  • EPA 3: Demonstrate, model, and teach skills associated with developing an action plan with a learner or protégé

  • EPA 4: Demonstrate, model and teach skills associated with establishing accountability and assessing progress with learner or protégé

  • EPA 5: Structure feedback to enhance the ability of the learner (other) to process and apply it
     
  • Personal Awareness Domain
    EPA 1:
    Cultivate awareness of one’s own emotions and biases; model and articulate the importance of PA in relationship centered communication
    EPA 2: Facilitate and teach facilitation of personal awareness in others to their benefit and attend to safety
    EPA 3: Handle challenging situations
Faculty Mentors/Guides
Each FIT is paired with an ACH faculty member who will act as a mentor to facilitate progress and growth during training. FITs and Guides meet regularly to discuss learning issues and to negotiate many aspects of training relative to creating and implementing a learning plan. If accepted into the FIT program, you will be provided with a list of available Guides compiled by the FIT Committee. The FIT Co-Directors will assist you in identifying a subset of potential Guides given your individual background, interests, and needs, and will then broker either in-person or phone meetings with these individuals so that the mutual FIT-Guide selection process can begin. More detailed information can be found in Choosing a Guide: A Primer.

Program Cost
 FIT Program Annual Fees (and Other Associated Costs)
Required Activity  
 
                        
Annual program TUITION 



Annual ACH Membership*(Assuming 1-year professional membership)

$1,250


 
$235

Winter Course  

Estimated registration fee inclusive of tuition, lodging, and meals
(Assuming early bird registration and double occupancy)
 $2,000
 
Estimated travel expenses

 
$500
ENRICH Course  
 
Estimated registration (Assuming early bird registration).  $300 discount
 $995

Estimated lodging (Assuming double occupancy)
 $800

Estimated travel expenses

 $500

Annual FIT Program tuition + other associated costs =
Estimated annual investment


 $6,280



Required ACH Activities

Upon acceptance into the FIT program, FITs are required to participate in ACH's annual Winter Course, ENRICH course, and serve on an ACH committee, which provide in-person opportunities to attain the FIT program EPAs:  

WINTER COURSE

The Winter Course is a 5-day immersive learning experience (typically held in early February) for current FITs, RCFs, and Faculty, which focuses on:

 

  • Personal Awareness (Domain #4)- FITs are placed in small groups (usually < 10 people) led by facilitation professionals, each with unique styles and approaches to personal awareness.  Styles may include Matrix Leadership, Diversity, Rogerian, Family of Origin, Anima Learning, etc.  The purpose of personal awareness groups is to: provide a learner-centered environment where participants can set personal learning goals related to interpersonal & communication skills, personal awareness and development, and reflection. Additionally, participants have the opportunity to practice challenging communication scenarios and receive feedback and coaching.
  • FIT Skills- In a series of skills sessions, FITs learn, practice, and receive feedback on essential communication skills.  Past skills sessions have focused on group facilitation challenges, giving/receiving feedback, diversity, and role play.  

  • ​Workshop Content & Development (Domain #2)- FITs have an opportunity to work alongside ACH faculty in the development and delivery of a single workshop session to their FIT and faculty peers.  This provides a venue to "test run" a potential workshop in a safe environment and receive constructive feedback, to share about an emerging topic of interest, and can also serve as a venue for attaining EPAs in the workshop domain of the FIT program.  Samples of recent Winter Course workshops include: Mentoring for the 21st Century: Developing skills in mentoring across differences, Measurement in the Service of Compassion: RCC, Healthcare Disparities and Data, Exploring Cognitive Biases through Poetry and Visual Art, Making Role-Play Exercises Fun and Effective: Advanced Role-Play Techniques Addressing Communication Skills Training Challenges, etc.

  • Facilitated Large Group Sessions- FITs attend large group sessions led by the same professional facilitators of the small personal awareness groups. Large group sessions provide the opportunity to learn more about timely themes within healthcare communication in a group activity-based format rather than a keynote didactic format.  Themes vary from year to year, but recent courses have focused on: diversity, vulnerability and imperfection, personal and organizational change, etc.

ENRICH COURSE
The ENRICH course is a 4-day intensive and interactive course (typically held in early-mid June) open to any healthcare professionals interested in communication and relationship-centered care.  FITs, like ACH Faculty, have specific roles and responsibilities at this course, including the development and delivery of interactive workshop tracks, co-facilitation of small learning groups, and attending debrief meetings.

  • Facilitation (Domain #1)- FITs are required to co-facilitate a small learning group with an ACH faculty member at ENRICH.  Using skills learned at Winter Course, FITs will act in a co-facilitator role, rather than as a participant.  To graduate from the FIT program, FITs must co-facilitate at least one "Integrated" group, plus one other modality (i.e. Narrative, Case-based, Intact Team, Leadership, Family-of-Origin, Improvisation, etc.)  The daily FIT and faculty meetings, as well as the course debrief meeting provide opportunities for practicing and refining debrief skills, which are part of the facilitation domain.
     
  • Workshop Content and Development (Domain #2)-  FITs are required to help plan and deliver at least 2 different workshops during their time in the FIT program.  ENRICH offers another opportunity to complete this requirement.  However, unlike Winter Course, the workshops at ENRICH are formatted as tracks, with each session building on the last.  Typically ENRICH workshop teams have several FITs and faculty per team, which provides an opportunity for learning more about the other essential components of the FIT program: leadership, teamwork, conflict engagement, and diversity.

SERVICE ON AN ACH COMMITTEE
FITs are required to serve on at least one ACH committee during their time in the program.  This engages the FITs at the organizational level of ACH, provides opportunities to work with and get to know fellow ACH members and leaders, provides a FIT voice/perspective on ACH programs and activities, and develops skills such as leadership, teamwork, conflict engagement, and handling diversity.  Appropriate committees may include: ENRICH Planning Committee, Winter Course Planning Committee, FIT Committee, RCF Committee, Education Committee, Diversity Committee, Membership Committee, etc. 

YEARLY CORRESPONDENCE

  • Completion of FIT/guide evaluation form
  • Meeting or conversation with FIT co-directors or appointed member of the FIT committee

 

Contact Us
Julie Crosson, MD
FIT Program Co-Director
Boston University/Dorchester House
Boston, MA
julie.crosson@gmail.com
Carol Chou, MD
FIT Program Co-Director
University of Pennsylvania
Philadelphia, PA
fsamaha@comcast.net 
Lindsay Overall
Program Manager
ACH
Lexington, Kentucky
loverall@amrms.com
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